Jennifer Dean

About Jennifer Dean

Jennifer L. Dean is a partner and vice-chair of the firm's Intellectual Property Practice Group, and the chair of Drinker Biddle's Trademarks practice team. The World Trademark Review 1000 survey has described Jennifer as the “smart, fast and practical” chair of a “proactive, extremely knowledgeable and timing-sensitive” group that provides “incomparably good” service. In addition, Managing Intellectual Property named Jennifer among the “Top 250 Women in IP,” and identified her as an “IP Star” in 2014-2016. Jennifer's practice encompasses trademark clearance, registration and enforcement, focusing in particular on brand selection and management, and on litigation before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. She manages global trademark portfolios in fields ranging from soft drinks to reinsurance, and also advises clients on copyright and licensing issues.

Trademark Traps for the Unwary, Part 1: Black-and-White Registrations Abroad are a Gray Area

US trademark aficionados know that US registrations depicting logos in black and white allow the trademark owner to display the registered mark in any color.  Filing in black and white is often a good way to achieve broader protection in the States, and it helps avoid your having to file a new application if you change the color of your logo in the future.  The next time you want to protect your logo outside the USA, however, pause before you send that email to local counsel or submit your Madrid Protocol application depicting the logo in black and white.  It’s not safe to assume that a black-and-white registration outside the USA confers “universal” protection for a mark displayed in any color.

To elaborate:  counsel in a number of jurisdictions have informed us that black-and-white registrations may not protect marks displayed in any color.  We’ve heard this from the EU, Kazakhstan, and Thailand, among other places – though you will of course want to check this with your own local counsel, since this is a fact-specific issue.  Worse yet, black-and-white registrations outside the USA may be subject to attack on non-use grounds if the trademark isn’t used in black and white.  (How often does that happen?!)

We haven’t run across a treatise or other resource that drills down to this level of trademark nerddom, so this might be a good topic to add to the next edition of the Country Guides (accessible to members of the International Trademark Association).  In the meantime – now you’re equipped to ask some more pre-filing questions, to help ensure that your future logo applications will achieve maximum protection.

Seven Strategies for Speedy Service Mark (and Trademark) Registration

We really love registering service marks. Trademarks, too. (Mentioning service marks in the title of this post better served our alliterative inclinations.) What’s even more fun is finding new ways to register trademarks as quickly and cost-effectively as possible – which frees up time and money we can use to…register more trademarks.  Hooray!

In case you are of a similar mindset, here are some things to ponder while you work on a new US application.

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Are You Brand Obsessed?

Are you one of those trademark professionals who can’t shed your “Brand Police” identity no matter where you are or what you’re doing?  Take this quiz to assess whether you are truly Brand Obsessed:

  1. When you’re on vacation, do you make detours to out-of-the-way shops to find out if they carry the brands you work with?
  2. Do you get especially excited when you see your brands outside your home country?
  3. Have you talked about trademark matters so much that family members now ask you why a store’s sign shows a “TM” notice rather than an encircled-R notice?
  4. Do family members also ask you “Why was Company X able to register that mark?  Isn’t that merely descriptive?”
  5. When you like someone’s clothing, do you ask “Who makes that?” and not “Where did you buy that?”
  6. Do you often try to identify the source of others’ handbags, shoes and wallets by looking at their shape, material and hardware, just because you think it’s fun?
  7. Do you clip “look for” or anti-genericide advertising from publications you read at home, so you can show them to the marketing team?
  8. Do you use the Trademark Office’s web site to look up brands you encountered on your personal shopping trips?
  9. Does your phone contain more photos of Trademark Office specimens than photos of loved ones?
  10. Does your phone contain more photos of potential infringement than photos of your dog or cat?

If you said “Yes” to 5 or more of the above, it’s confirmed… you are indeed Brand Obsessed.   Welcome to the ranks!

 

Review Your Portfolio Every Which Way

WARNING: major trademark nerd content to follow… only those seriously interested in quality assurance need read on!

Seriously, we’re here to share a tip that may help you spot anomalies in your trademark portfolio, thus saving money… and heartache… and priority battles… later on. Here goes: We all know that it’s important to generate and review docket reports listing upcoming filing deadlines. (We like weekly meetings for that purpose.) But it’s often a good idea to add the following to the mix: produce and review a spreadsheet that lists your active registrations and applications in alphabetical order by country, then by mark. Like this:

Country Name Trademark Name Class Trademark Status Application Number Filing Date Publication Date Registration Number Registration Date Next Renewal Date
Australia DRINKER BIDDLE 45 Pending 123456 10/30/15
Benelux DRINKER BIDDLE 45 Registered 789101112 10/30/15 789101112 10/30/15 10/30/25

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Top Twelve Tips for Avoiding the Foreign Filing Deadline Crunch

Our corner of the IP world is chock-full of minutiae – powers of attorney, legalized declarations of intent to use, merger certificates, you name it.  So how do we manage all those details and still meet dozens of filing deadlines every week?

Very carefully.

Seriously, here are a few tricks we use to tackle foreign trademark filing and renewal requirements. These tactics help us meet deadlines with time to spare, and without having to go back to our clients multiple times to request additional documents. We’re all about efficiency!

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Our Second (Sort of) Secret Weapon: Time-of-Filing Trademark Watching Services

You might remember from Tore DeBella’s post that we just love letters of protest . They can delay or even avoid the need to file formal opposition proceedings in the United States Patent and Trademark Office. But wait — how do you learn about conflicting applications *before* they’re published for opposition purposes? Many watching services don’t notify you of conflicting applications until *after* the application has been published. That’s almost always too late to get your letter of protest granted.

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